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How Republican George Shultz Sold Me on Global Warming and the Need for Sustainable Development

How Republican George Shultz Sold Me on Global Warming and the Need for Sustainable Development

28 January 2018   By Gregory Beier   

My interest in Corporate Social Responsibility was sparked by my travels to the Himalayas

My interest in Corporate Social Responsibility was sparked by my travels to the Himalayas, the “Roof of the World,” which gave me the perspective that I lacked in London working in the so-called center of finance to grasp Global Warming and see just how precarious our system is.

In 2004, I read in Nepal an English-language newspaper article with a black and white photo taken one hundred years earlier of a valley filled with an ancient glacier compared to a current color picture showing the same valley from the same perspective with just a puddle in it. 

In 2008, I visited Bhutan and discussed their hydropower industry with a local policy-maker who pointed out that it would only last for another 40 years because of “global warming,” implying that the snowmelt would eventually become insufficient to turn the turbines.

The final unmistakeable proof came at home from Reagan Republican George Schultz

The final unmistakeable proof came at home from, of all people, George Schultz, a Reagan Republican who said at the Wall Street Journal Eco:nomics conference in Santa Barbara in the spring of 2013 (while playing the below video), “There is a new ocean forming in the Arctic. This is not theory - it is plain observation.

I do not believe that we have a choice to carry on with business as normal. Therefore, I am inspired to apply the UN Sustainable Development Goals to direct and public investments in emerging and developed markets and see this framework become successfully adopted.

In the mid-1980s, the winter sea ice pack in the Arctic was dominated by multi-year ice-ice that had survived at least one summer melt. Today, less than half of the sea ice at winter maximum has survived at least one summer.